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Bay Shore Schools
Global Nine
Social Studies - Global History 9

Prehistoric/Early Civilizations

Archaeological Evidence: Cave Paintings
The learner will be able to 1. understand how information is gained about early humans from archaeological evidence, such as paleolithic cave paintings found in Spain and France.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Archaeological Evidence Knowledge, Comprehension Master 0.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 4 - 9 [Textbook].  Dawn of History: Write on board: "What does a civilization need to survive?" Have students imagine that they lived 30,000 years ago during the Stone Age. Ask: How would you use your natural resources to survive? Create a chart comparing and contrasting the Paleolithic and Neolithic times with the students. VOCABULARY: Archaeologists- scientists who find and analyze the physical remains left by early people. Artifacts- objects made by human beings. Anthropology- the study of humans and the societies they create. Technology- refers to skills and tools people use to meet their basic needs. Prehistory- refers to the long period of time before people invented systems of writing. Historians- study of how people lived in the past. Geography- the study of people, their environment, and the resources available to them. Latitude- measures distance north or south of the Equator. Longitude- measures distance east and west of the Prime Meridian.
  
Archaeological Evidence: Studies
The learner will be able to 1. demonstrate knowledge of how early humans are studied and what archaeological evidence reveals about their communities.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Archaeological Evidence Comprehension Master 0.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 10 - 12 [Textbook].  Divide the class into five groups and have each group be responsible for one section of a chart on the five geographic themes. Each group should define its theme and list several examples to illustrate it. Students should find magazine photos to illustrate their themes. Compile the five themes into one class chart. Have representatives from each group explain the importance of their theme to the work of archaeologists and historians.
  
Agriculture: Trace Origins
The learner will be able to 1. trace the origins of the development of various agrarian societies.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Community: Agriculture Comprehension Master 0.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 13 - 15 [Textbook].  Create a web with the class describing various Agraian societies.
  
Early Civilizations: Sequence
The learner will be able to 1. sequence the events leading to civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Early Civilizations Application Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 13 - 15 [Textbook].  Create, with the class, a timeline which explains events leading to early civilization. VOCABULARY: Bureaucracy- is a system of managing a government through departments run by appointed officials. Polytheistic- belief in many Gods. Monotheistic- belief in one God. Artisans- skilled craftworkers. City-State- a political unit that included a city and its surrounding lands and villages. Empire- is a group of states or territories controlled by one ruler. Steppes- less-fertile land, mostly dry grasslands. Cultural Diffusion- the spread of ideas, customs, and technologies from one place to another.
  
Hunter-Gatherer: Advantage/Disadvantage
The learner will be able to 1. describe advantages and disadvantages of hunter-gatherer communities.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Community: Hunter-Gatherer Comprehension Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 15 - 20 [Textbook].  With the class construct a cause-effect diagram on the chalkboard to illustrate cultural changes that resulted from the Neolithic agricultural revolution. Have students discuss the changes concerning each of the following: food, population, communities, tools, work, gender roles, government, personal property, and technology. VOCABULARY: Nomad- people who move from place to place in order to survive. Glacier- sheets of ice. Paleolithic Age- Old Stone Age. Neolithic Age- New Stone Age. Agricultural Revolution- discovery of farming and taming animals which led to a growth in population, which in turn let to more interaction among human communities.
  
Mesopotamia: Sumeria/Success
The learner will be able to 1. discuss how geographic conditions allowed civilization to develop in Mesopotamia.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mesopotamia Knowledge, Evaluation Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 31 - 35 [Textbook].  Have students look at the map of the ancient Middle East on page 32 in the World History book. Explain to the students that the Fertile Crescent has been called the "crossroads of the world." Ask the class to describe the geographic factors that might have given rise to this name. VOCABULARY: Ziggurats- pyramid-temples that soared toward the heavens. Hierarchy- system of rank. Cuneiform- earliest type of writing created by the Sumerians.
  
Mesopotamia: Characteristics/Government
The learner will be able to 1. identify the characteristics of the city-states of ancient Sumer.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mesopotamia Knowledge Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 35 - 37 [Textbook].  Draw a chart on the chalkboard with two columns, Sumer and Egypt. Label the rows Geography, Religion, Economy, Government, Social Structure, and Achievements. Have students complete the charts by working individually or in groups. After students have finished their charts, lead the class in discussing the similarities and differences between Sumer and Egypt. Ask students to imagine that they are the leaders of ancient Middle Eastern people who have invaded Sumer. Ask students to answer the following questions: Why were you willing to battle the Sumerians for control of Mesopotamia? Since conquering the Sumerians, what have your people learned from Sumerian civilization?
  
Mesopotamia: Code of Hammurabi
The learner will be able to 1. evaluate the Code of Hammurabi vis-a-vis the development of civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Application, Analysis, Synthesis Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Enjoying Global History [Textbook].  See pages 13 - 17 in Enjoying Global History for specific examples from Hammurabi's Code. Write on the chalkboard the following quote: "An Eye For An Eye." Have students explain the meaning of this quote and formulate opinions for and against the quote by considering its possible advantages and disadvantages. Students should support their opinions with logical arguments. Read the Code of Hammurabi and ask students: What is the difference between the philosophy underlying punishment for crimes prescribed here and the philosophy underlying punishment for crimes in the U.S.? Conduct a Touchstone activity based on the following question: Who determines the laws in American society?
  
Middle East: Invasions & Spread of I
The learner will be able to 1. identify other great civilizations of the near east and discuss their contributions to civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Comprehension Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 37 - 43 [Textbook].  Work with the class to make a web showing the different ways that trade and warfare affected life in the Middle East. VOCABULARY: Civil Laws- laws dealing with private rights and matters, such as business contracts. Satrap- governor of a province in the Persian empire. Barter Economy- exchanging one set of goods for another set of goods. Colony- is a territory settled and ruled by people from a distant land.
  
Egypt: Geography
The learner will be able to 1. explain how the geography allowed civilization to develop in the Nile River valley.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Egypt Knowledge Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 22 -26 [Textbook].  Egypt: Have students trace the route of the Nile and examine the surrounding terrain. Ask students What generalizations can you make about the importance of the Nile to the people of Egypt? Show map and highlight the Nile River. Have students write a story on the following: You have just made an important archaeological discovery in Egypt, write a story explaining your discovery. Use your imagination and be creative. Students are to create a profile of someone from ancient Egypt describing the life of one of the following: Tutankhamen, Osiris, Isis, priest. VOCABULARY: Silt- soil Cataract- waterfall. Delta- is a triangular area of marshland formed by deposits of silt at the mouth of some rivers. Dynasty- ruling family. Pharaohs- Egyptian ruler during the Old Kingdom. Vizier- chief minister to supervise the business of government.
  
Egypt: Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms
The learner will be able to 1. identify the characteristics of the main periods in Egyptian.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Egypt Knowledge Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 26 - 31 [Textbook].  Have students make a chart showing the three periods or kingdoms of ancient Egypt. Instruct students to include information under the following headings: Government, Accomplishments, and Reasons for Decline. Have students use the data on their charts to compare and discuss the three kingdoms.
  
Egypt: Characteristics of Civilization
The learner will be able to 1. identify and analyze the main features of Egyptian civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 26 - 31 [Textbook].  Archaeologists and historians use a variety of sources to learn about life in ancient Egypt. Ask students to make a list of the different kinds of records left by the ancient Egyptians and explain what they tell us. Students will write a headline and brief news account about the decoding of the Rosetta Stone. They should include quotations from historians or archaeologists explaining why this discovery is so valuable. VOCABULARY: Mummification- the preservation of the dead. Hieroglyphics- form of picture writing used by the Egyptians. Demotic- a simpler form of writing for everyday use. Papyrus- a plant that grows along the banks of the Nile used as a writing material.
  
China: Early Civilizations
The learner will be able to 1. identify the features that allowed civilization to develop in China.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Analysis, Synthesis Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 58 - 60 [Textbook].  Ask students to compare early Chinese civilization with the other early civilizations that they have studied. Have students read poems from the Book of Songs and have students create their own poem. VOCABULARY: Loess- fine windblown yellow soil. Clans- groups of families who claimed a common ancestor.
  
China: Shang & Zhou
The learner will be able to 1. identify the patterns of civilizations established by the Shang and the Zhou dynasties.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Knowledge Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 58 - 64 [Textbook].  Assign each student a Chinese dynasty and have the students research that particular dynasty. VOCABULARY: Feudalism- a system of government in which local lords governed their own lands but owed military service and other forms of support to the ruler.
  
China: Rise of Strong Rulers
The learner will be able to 1. discuss how strong Qin & Han rulers influenced the development of China.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Synthesis Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 93 - 96 [Textbook].  Compare and contrast the strength of the Qin and Han dynasties vs the Shang and Zang dynasties. Have students plan and create a bulletin board that highlights important information. Have students imagine that they are a Chinese trader traveling along the Silk Road during the Han dynasty. Students will write a poem or letter describing how they feel about their journey.
  
China: Philosophy and Religion
The learner will be able to 1. identify the salient aspects of Confucianism, Taoism, and Legalism and discuss their role in Chinese society.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Knowledge, Comprehension Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 90 - 93 [Textbook].  Divide students up into three teams (Daoist, Confucius, and Legalist). Have each team come up with facts about their school of thought and why their school of thought would be the best school for China to adopt. Teams will debate as to which belief system China should choose. Have students imagine that they are Chinese government officials, ask them to discuss what they like and dislike about each philosophy. Write a dialogue between Confucius, Hanfeizi, and Laozi on the proper role of government. VOCABULARY: Ideographs- signs that expressed thoughts or ideas which develpoed by the ancient Chinese. Calligraphy- fine handwriting which is turned into an elegant form of art.
  
China: Han Dynasty
The learner will be able to 1. discuss why the Han period is identified as a golden age of Chinese civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Knowledge, Comprehension, Application Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 93 - 96 [Textbook].  Ask students to imagine that they are one of the following: a critic of Shi Huangdi, a laborer on the Great Wall, a silk trader, a Confucian scholar-official, a woman, or a scientist during the early classical age. In the role they have chosen, have students write a letter to a friend in which they describe their feelings and attitudes about life in China. In their letter they should also describe some of their daily activities. Set aside time for students to share their letters with the class. The Chinese historian Sima Qian and the American entrepreneur Wally Amos both praise hard work, determination, and perseverance. Both seem to place great value on success in the form of economic prosperity. Some people, however, see disadvantage to a life of hard work in the pursuit of wealth and success. Robert Louis Stevenson, the Scottish novelist once remarked, "Perpetual devotion to what a man calls his business is only to be sustained by perpetual neglect of many other things." On the same subject, the American poet Robert Frost commented, "By working faithfully eight hours a day, you may eventually get to be a boss and work twelve hours a day." Read these quotations to the class and ask students to rephrase them in their own words. In a class discussion, ask students to compare the viewpoints of Stevenson and Frost with those of Sima Qian and Wally Amos. Finally, ask students to discuss their own views on the nature of success and the means to achieving it.
  
Indus Valley: Mohenjo Daro
The learner will be able to 1. demonstrates knowledge of the Mohenjo Daro civilization within the Indus Valley.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Indus Valley Comprehension Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 50 - 52 [Textbook].  Point out for hundreds of years the Aryans preserved prayers, hymns, and long epic poems without the benefit of a written language. Ask students to speculate on how the Aryans accomplished this. Then, have students discuss the special difficulties of maintaining an oral tradition. Viewpoint Activity: Discuss the following question; " Did Democracy develop in the Indus Valley?" Unit 1 folder (page 46) provides two points of view on whether well-organized cities suggested repressive, strictly controlled government. VOCABULARY: Subcontinent- is a large landmass that juts out from a continent. Monsoon- seasonal wind, a defining feature of India.
  
Indus Valley: Trade Routes/Evaluate
The learner will be able to 1. evaluate the importance of the trade routes between Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley in 3000 BCE.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Indus Valley Application, Evaluation Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 50 - 52 [Textbook].  Have students create a map of the Indus Valley and evaluate the importance of trade routes between Mesopotamia, Egypt, and India.
  
Indus Valley: Collapse/Analyze Causes
The learner will be able to 1. analyze causes of the collapse of Indus Valley civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Indus Valley Analysis Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 53 - 58 [Textbook].  Critical Thinking: have students discuss the following questions: How could natural disasters contributed to the decline of Indus Valley civilization? What ecological problems does the world face today?
  
India: Development of Empires
The learner will be able to 1. identify and discuss how the Maurya and Gupta Empires developed.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Knowledge Master 0.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 82 - 87 [Textbook].  Ask students to imagine that they lived in India many hundreds of years ago. Have students write eyewitness reports of life in either the Maurya or Gupta Empire. Instruct them to include references to government, city life, the economy, and religion. Their accounts should also refer to achievements in literature, art, and science. Finally, their reports should describe contacts with other people through warfare and trade. Have students share their eyewitness reports with the class. VOCABULARY: Castes- social groups into which people are born and from which they cannot change. Brahman- meaning to reside in all things. Mystics- people who devote their lives to seeking spiritual truth. Rajahs- Aryan tribal chiefs.
  
India: Religions and philosophy
The learner will be able to 1. analyze how the Hindu and Buddhist beliefs affected the development of Indian civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Agrarian Society Synthesis Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 87 - 90 [Textbook].  India: The Empire of the Spirit, a program in six-part 1991 public television series Legacy, provides visual evidence of India's past and present. The program examines how Hindu traditions affect Indian life today. It includes scenes of castes and village life, the importance of the Ganges, the sacredness of the cow, and varied forms of worship. As students view this program ask them to identify and describe the ways in which Hindu traditions shape life in India today. Make a chart diagram comparing and contrasting both Hinduism and Buddhism.
  
Eurasia: Mycenaeans/Development
The learner will be able to 1. understand the development of the Mycenaean society.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Eurasia Comprehension Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages: 104 - 107 [Textbook].  Ask students to recall the Greek myths and legends that they have encountered in films and literature. Invite volunteers to list some Greek Gods and heroes on the board. Have students describe what they know about each. Review with the students the meaning of the word hero. Have students prepare a written report on a hero who has special meaning for them. The hero may be from history, legend, or personal experience. In their reports, students should give examples of the deeds that demonstrate their chosen figure's heroism. They should also describe admirable qualities that their hero possesses and explain why they find those traits to be important. VOCABULARY: Strait- narrow water passages.
  
Eurasia: Mycenaeans/Compare/Contrast
The learner will be able to 1. compare and contrast the characteristics of Mycenaean and Minoan societies.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Eurasia Analysis Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages:104 - 107 [Textbook].  Create a chart with the students comparing and contrasting the Mycenaean and Minoan societies.
  
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Ancient Era (1000 BCE - 300 CE)

Greece: Rise of Greek City-States
The learner will be able to 1. discuss how geography affected the development of Greek civilization.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Comprehension Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 107 - 113 [Textbook].  1. Early People of the Aegean: 1.Read the Iliad. 2. Prepare a mock trail of Paris for his crime of stealing Helen of Troy and beginning the Trojan War. Have students create a chart titled Early Civilizations of Greece. Information on the chart should include the following: similarities and differences between Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations, contributions of trade in the Aegean world, and epics of Homer. 3. Have students write three main ideas from the chapter (World History book) and find supporting facts (example: By about 400 BC Minoan civilization had vanished. Supporting Fact---Some archeologists think a nearby volcanic eruption or earthquake followed by invaders caused the civilization to collapse. Supporting Facts--- 4. Students are to imagine that they are Heinrich Schliemann (story in World History book) and design a newspaper advertisement to attract helpers for the expedition to discover the ruins of Troy. 2. Touchstones activity: Read The Iliad, BK. VI by Homer and have students answer the following questions: Why does Hector return to fight? Should Hector stay home? Group discussion (following the Touchstone rules) will follow based on the question: Should one, or does one, leave one's family and go to war? VOCABULARY: Polis- the Greeks evolved a unique version of the city-state which they called the polis. Acropolis- high city. Aristocracy- rule by a landholding elite. Oligarchy- government power is in the hands of a small, powerfuld elite, usually from the business class. Phalanx- a massive formation of heavily armed foot soilder. Democracy- government by the people. Tyrants- people who gain power by force. Legislature- lawmaking body.
  
Greek Civilizations: Athens and Sparta
The learner will be able to 1. compare and contrast the societies that developed in Athens and Sparta.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis Master 2.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages: 113 - 116 [Textbook].   Rise of Greek City-States: 1. Hand out map of Greece and explain how the geography influenced the Greek city-states. Ask students which system of government do they believe is best. Use the following analogy to start the discussion: All decisions made by: a. the principal b. the five students with the highest GPA c. by all students voting equally. Which system of rule is best for our school? Explain that the Greeks had governments much like the examples given above and discuss different types of government systems. 2. Explain what is meant by a cause and an effect. Have students create a chart and fill in the effects of the following situations: Cause---Greece is located on a mountainous peninsula surrounded by rocky islands. Effect---? Cause---With its hundreds of bays, the Greek coastline provided safe harbors for ships. Effect---? Cause---As trade expanded, a new Greek middle class emerged that challenged the nobles for power and came to rule in some city-states. Effect---? Cause--- Spartan boys undertook a harsh training program, moving into military barracks at the age of seven. Effect---? Cause---Turmoil in Athens increased when farmers fell on hard times and had to sell themselves and their families into slavery. Effect---? 3. Write the following two terms on the chalkboard: demos and kratia. Tell students that these are Greek terms. Tell them that the first term means people and the second term means power or rule. Have the class speculate the English language word which may have derived from these terms ( answer: Democracy). 4. Have students determine whether they would like to be residents of Athens or Sparta. Tell them to write an editorial that describes their city's society, relate how they feel about it, and explain why it is better than the society of the other city-state. 5. Read page 113 to 116 in the World History book. Give each student a note card and ask him or her to write a headline for a newspaper article based on an event described in the reading (example: Athenians Victorious at Sparta). Collect note cards and place the headlines in a bag. Ask each student to pick a headline and draw a political cartoon to accompany it. Remind students to include who, what, where, when and how of the event. Make sure students label the symbols or people in their cartoon. 6. Imagine that it is the year 425 BC. You and some of your classmates have been assigned to produce a magazine to be called either Athenian Life or Spartan Life. Decide which city-state you want to write about and brainstorm a list of questions about life in that city-state. Questions might include: How did men and women dress? What were their responsibilities? Who were the most influential leaders? What was happening on the war front? Divide questions among group members and research your questions. Discuss results of your research and together make a list of possible topics. Use this list to make a table of contents for your magazine. Prepare brief articles on two topics. One article should focus on news, such as war or politics and the other article should focus on daily life or the arts. Plan a cover for your magazine. Students can either have a member of the group draw a cover or do a collage cover. The group will then present their newspaper to the class. 7. Viewpoint Activity: Give a reading on the values of Sparta and Athens and have a discussion on the similarities and differences that exist between the two city-states. 8. Have students read the Funeral Oration of Pericles. Have a discussion on the following question: Was Pericles right about Athens being "the wonder of…succeeding ages"? Have them support their answers. VOCABULARY: Direct-Democracy- in which a large number of male citizens took part in the day-to-day affairs of government.
  
Greek Civilizations: Social Class
The learner will be able to 1. demonstrate knowledge of social classes and how they affected the development of city-states, such as Athens, Corinth, Sparta, and/or Thebes.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Knowledge, Comprehension Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 116 - 117 [Textbook].  1. Debate on Athens vs Sparta. Pre-debate: Hand out debate procedures and read background, choose teams, go over procedures and hand out material, discuss debate techniques (knowing both points of view), and begin working. Debate--- Which city-state will lead Greece to greatness? In a more peaceable attempt at resolving Greek competition, students will determine which city-state should lead Greece. The debate should consist of a team supporting Athenian rule, a team supporting Spartan rule and a jury. Each team should make up an opening and closing statement and at least eight questions for the opposing team. The jury must make up at least ten questions and be ready to pose these questions to both teams. All groups must include information and questions based on the following: Geography-good or bad,? education, government system, role of women, treatment of slaves, economy, Persian war, Peloponnesian War, and Pericles. Jury will take notes as the debate takes place. Jury notes will include: did the teams include all material, did they ask good questions, were they able to give accurate answers to the questions posed, etc. The jury will decide the winning city-state. 2. Students will make up rap songs using information on Greece.
  
Greek Civilizations: Persian War Impact
The learner will be able to 1. examine the long-term impact of the Persian Wars upon Greece.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Analysis Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 116 - 121 [Textbook].  1. Activity sheet (Guided Reading and Review page 26) titled Victory and Defeat in the Greek World.
  
Greece: Contributions to Civilization
The learner will be able to 1. identify how the Greeks contributed to the development of civilization in the development of philosophy, government, science, mathematics, and literature.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 116 -121 [Textbook].   The Glory of Greece: 1. Have students create a main idea web which will include the contributions of the Greeks (stem of web should include the arts, architecture, poetry and drama, history, and philosophy). 2. Students will create a discussion between a philosopher and someone of their choice today (example: parent, movie star, political figure, etc). The discussion must include the following: the philosophers reasons for the glory of Greece, what the philosopher is known for, why do you think that the philosopher is important or not, and how did this philosopher effect history. 3. Writing a Story: Thucydides wrote about an event he had lived through because he believed it would still have an impact years later. Students will choose an event in their own lifetime that they think historians will write about 100 years from now. They are to write a creative story explaining why this event is important and how they would like to be seen in years to come due to this event. 4. Touchstone activity on the reading "Life of Pericles." Students will make up a question based on the reading and then the class will vote on which question they would like to discuss (Touchstone rules must be followed). 5. Trial or Debate: Should individuals obey the law? Students will be given information that deals with the philosophy of Socrates. Students will be divided into three teams (one team will research why Socrates should live, one team will research why Socrates should die, and the third team will be the jury that will question for both sides). Worksheets should be given to each student to guide them during the debate. 5. DBQ: Ancient Greek Contributions VOCABULARY: Rhetoric- the art of skillful speaking. Tragedies- plays which tell stories of human suffering that usually ends in disaster. Comedies- humorous plays.
  
Greek Civilizations: Hellenistic Age
The learner will be able to 1. analyze how Greek civilization was affected by the rise of the Macedonians.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Greek Civilizations Analysis Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 121 -127 [Textbook].   Alexander and the Hellenistic Age: 1. Have student react to the following statement: "He was a good ruler." What qualities might cause a ruler to be great? Have students work in groups of four and prepare a TV news report on Alexander and the Hellenistic civilization. The following topics must be included in the news report: Philip of Macedonia, Alexander's conquest, the significance of new urban cities, and the Hellenistic civilization.
  
Rome: Growth of the Republic
The learner will be able to 1. analyze the geographic factors that led to the rise of Rome. 2.analyze the features that led to the development and strength of the Roman Republic.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Roman Empire Evaluation Master 1.0 Global History: Connections to Today. Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 128 -135 [Textbook].   1. Define republic, patrician, consul, dictator, plebein, tribune, veto, legion. Describe two ways that the geography of Italy influenced the rise of Rome. Ask students: Why were plebians discontented during the early republic? What reforms did they win? 2. Roman heros were admired for their courage, loyalty, and devotion to duty. Name one of your American heros and list qualitites that they display. Students should connect their information on heros with that of Rome. VOCABULARY: Republic- officials are chosen by the people, known as "thing of the people." Patricians- members of the landholding upper class. Consuls- elected by senators whose job was to supervise the buisness of government and command the armies. Dictator- ruler who has complete control over a government. Plebeians- the farmers, merchants, artisans, and traders who made up the bulk of the population.Tribunes- officials who were elected by the Plebeians. Veto- to block or reject a law. Legion- basic unit of the ancient Roman army.
  
Roman Empire
The learner will be able to explain why Rome was a successful conqueror.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Roman Empire Synthesis Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 135 -141 [Textbook].  1. Connect relevant lines from the play Julius Caesar. Imagine you are one of the plotters against Julius Caesar and create a political cartoon that shows why you oppose him. 2. Write the following main ideas on the board and have students support the idea with facts: A. Julius Caesar emerged as a leader with great ambitions who attempted to reform Roman government. B. Augustus saw Rome through its recovery from a long civil war and laid the foundation for a stable government in the new Roman Empire. C. Family and religion played an important role in Roman society. VOCABULARY: Sect- small group. Martyrs- people who suffer or die for their beliefs. Heresies- beliefs said to be contrary to official Church teachings.
  
Rome: Changes in the Empire
The learner will be able to 1. analyze the changes that took place in Rome as the Empire grew.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Roman Empire Knowledge, Comprehension, Application Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 141 -144 [Textbook].  1. Construct an annotated timeline for the years between 133 B.C. and A.D. 180. The timeline should include references to a new class of wealthy people, the Gracchus reforms, civil wars, the rise and fall of Julius Caesar, and the reigns of Augustus, Nero, and other emperors. VOCABULARY: Aqueduct- bridgelike stone structures that brought water from the hills into Roman cities.
  
Rome: Fall of the Empire
The learner will be able to 1. explain why the Rome was not successful in dealing with the problems that would eventually bring down the Empire.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Roman Empire Analysis, Synthesis Master 1.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 148 - 152 [Textbook].  1. Powerpoint Presentation on the political, military, economic, and social causes for the fall of Rome. 2. Students will imagine themselves to be a Roman consul. They have some power, but they are not Gods. They must obey the will of the people, keep the rich happy, and still save Rome from self-destruction. As elected consuls, leaders of government, the student's job is to discuss and solve three major problems facing the Republic. Problem #1: Slaves are brought back from each conquered land. These slaves are assigned jobs in cities and on the farms, working for much less than any free Roman can. These slaves are putting free citizens, who are laborers and small farmers, out of work. Poor Romans are starving to dealth. What can we do? Problem #2: Under the Roman republic, elected officials use their positions to get rich. To get elected, some people are buying votes. The poor are quite happy to sell their votes to the highest bidder. Under this system, many people are elected who are poor governors. Graft and corruption are rampant. How can we ensure good government for Rome? Problem #3: Under the republic, Rome did not have a police force. Wealthy Romans hired guards and even built private armies. During elections these private armies often clash which is creating new havoc on the streets and unsafe conditions for innocent bystanders. Rome's streets are not safe for citizens after dark. How can we solve this problem? VOCABULARY: Mercenary- foreign soldies.
  
Americas: Olmecs & Mayans
The learner will be able to 1. describe the civilizations developed in Mesoamerica by the Olmecs and Mayan.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mesoamerica Civilizations Comprehension Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 158 - 165 [Textbook].  1. Create a chart titled Civilizations of Middle America. The chart will include the following information: cities, learning, agriculture, and social classes. VOCABULARY: Tribute- payment from conquered peoples.
  
Americas: Aztecs
The learner will be able to 1. compare and contrast the development of the Aztec Empire to the Olecs and Mayans.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mesoamerica Civilizations Evaluation Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 165 - 168 [Textbook].  1. Students will imagine that they have a contract with a travel agency to create a five minute Powerpoint presentation describing a tour through the Aztec empire. Students must include the most interesting and the most culturally significant places in the Aztec empire. Students should complete a planning sheet before creating their powerpoint presentation.
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 161 - 165 [Textbook].  
  
South America: Incas
The learner will be able to 1. analyze the differences between the Incas and the civilizations of Mesoamerica.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mesoamerica Civilizations Knowledge Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 165 - 168 [Textbook].  1. Working in groups, students will create catalogs for a museum exhibit on the Incas. Catalogs will include written material, maps, and diagrams (library time should be alloted). VOCABULARY: Quipu- a collection of knotted, colored string which helped scholars note dates and events as well as statistics on population and crops in ancient times.
  
North American Civilizations
The learner will be able to 1. compare and contrast the societies of North America to the civilizations that developed in South America.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
American Civilizations Comparison Application, Synthesis, Evaluation Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 169 - 176 [Textbook].  1. Students will choose three themes from the following: art and literature, continuity and change, diversity, economics and technology, geography and history, global interaction, impact of the individual, political and social systems, or religious and value systems. They will then explain how the three themes helped to establish the empire and how it influenced neighboring people and future generations. VOCABULARY: Kiva- a large underground chamber used for religious ceremonies. Potlatch- ceremony.
  
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Early Common Era (300 - 1450)

Medieval Europe: 500 - 1000 A.D.
The learner will be able to 1. describe the political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe after the fall of the Roman government.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Knowledge, Application Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 184 - 191 [Textbook].  1. Ask students: Why do historians refer to the early Middle Ages as the Dark Ages? Have students fill out the Historical Outline Map (Activity book page 16). Working in pairs, students assume the role of either Charlemagne or a poor Frankish farmer. Students will then write a script for a dialoge between the two in which they discuss the poor living conditions and explaination of how Charlemagne plans to remedy this problem. VOCABULARY: Middle Ages- term coined by Europeans to describe the period between 500 to 1500.
  
Europe: Merovingian Success/Evaluate
The learner will be able to 1. evaluate the Merovingian states' success in establishing local defense and keeping public order in western Europe.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Evaluation Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 184 - 186 [Textbook].  1. Divide students into four groups. Each group represents one of Clovis' sons who are competing for power after their father's death. Each group will research the personnal background of how the individual ruled. They will then prove to the German consul that their individual will be the best ruler and that the kingdom should be reunited under their power.
  
Europe: Carolingian Success/Evaluate
The learner will be able to 1. evaluate the Carolingian states' success in establishing local defense and keeping public order in western Europe.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Evaluation Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 184 - 186 [Textbook].  1. Divide students into four groups. Each group will represent a German consul. Each consul will research how the Merovigians ruled and formulate a plan that would include the following: Complaints against the Merovigians and a system of government to replace the aling dynasty. The teacher should use this activity as a lead into the development of the Carolingians.
  
Europe: France/Joan of Arc
The learner will be able to 1. demonstrate knowledge of Joan of Arc's life story.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Knowledge Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 231 - 232 [Textbook].  1. Issues for today activity: Compare Joan of Arc with a historical figure of today.
  
Europe: Royal Power
The learner will be able to 1. describe how royal officials, such as counts and dukes, transformed delegated power into hereditary, autonomous power over emerging European civilizations in the 9th and 10th centuries.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Comprehension Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 186 - 191 [Textbook].  1. Discuss the following question: In the struggle for power among monarchs, fuedal nobles, and Church officals, which group eventually gained the most political power? Why? 2. Students will write a dramatic scene or a short story about an event in the life of a person in this chapter. They will then research the person of their choice. When they have completed the project, students will write a summary explaining the importance of the person that they choose. VOCABULARY: Vassels- lessor lords. Fief- estate. Knight- mounted warrior. Chivalry- code of conducr in the late Middle Ages which was adopted by knights. Troubadours- wandering poets. Manor- lord's estate. Serfs- peasants who lived on the manor. Secular- wordly. Sacraments- sacred rituals of the Church. Canon Law- Churchs own body of law. Excommunication- anyone who refused to obey Church laws faced a range of penalties the most severe being excommunication. People who were excommunicated could not recieve the sacraments. Interdict- a powerful noble who violated Church laws could face interdict, which excluded an entire town, region, or kingdom from participating in most sacraments and from receiving Christian burial. Tithe- tax equal to a tenth of their incomes. Anti-Semitism- prejudice against Jews.
  
Europe: High Middle Ages
The learner will be able to 1. analyze why Europe began to change after 1000 A.D. 2. Students will discuss economic, political, and social changes after 1000 A.D.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Knowledge, Analysis Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 208 - 214 [Textbook].  1. Have students compare the High Middle Ages with the early Middle Ages. Have them note changes that occurred in each of the following areas: religion, government, the economy, society, and culture. Ask students to describe how European life changed as a result of contact with Middle Eastern and other Asian empires. VOCABULARY: Common Law- law that was common-the same-for all people. Jury- group of men sworn to speak the truth.
  
Europe: Monarchies/15th Century
The learner will be able to 1. explain the forces that started to shape the development of the national states in Europe during the 15th century.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Analysis Master 1.0 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 215 - 218 [Textbook].  1. Draw students' attention to the picture on page 216 (World History Book), which shows Emperor Henry IV asking for forgiveness from Pope Gregory VII. Read aloud the caption that accompanies the picture. Then, read the quote from Pope Innocent III at the beginning of the section. Ask students to discuss what both the picture and the quote suggest about the power of the Church during this period. 2. Ask students to draw a political cartoon based on the struggle between the Roman Catholic Church and the monarchs of Europe. Have them write titles and captions for their cartoons. Crusade- holy war. Theology- religion. Vernacular- the everyday languages of ordinary people. Scholasticism- Christian scholars, known as scholatics, tried to resolve the conflict between faith and reason. Their method was known as scholasticism were reason was used to support Christian beliefs.
  
Byzantine Empire
The learner will be able to 1. describe the nature of the Byzantine Empire and discuss why it survived the fall of Rome in the west.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Application, Synthesis Master 1.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 236 - 244 [Textbook].  1. Create a chart illustrating some of the differences between Roman Catholic and Byzantine Christianity. 2. Biography Activity: Unit 3 folder, page 46, profiles Anna Comnena, who was the first women historian in western civilization. 3. Ask students to imagine that they are writing a 10 chapter history book about the Byzantine empire. Ask them to write 10 chapter titles that would cover the history of the empire. VOCABULARY: Autocrat- sole ruler with complete authority. Patriarch- highest Church official. Icons- holy images. Schism- permanent split.
  
Russia: Rise of the Russian State
The learner will be able to 1. analyze the forces that led to the development of Russia.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
European Civilizations Comprehension Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 244 - 249 [Textbook].  1. Organize a debate on the following statement: "The one way to ensure absolute power is through the use of terror." 2. Have students create on a large sheet of paper an annotated timeline covering Russian history from the growth of Kiev to the 1600's. Advise students to include references to various invasions, the influence of diverse cultures on Russian civilization, and the significant actions of powerful leaders. Encourage students to use maps, drawings, and other illustrations to support their timelines. Use the timelines as the basis for a class discussion on the rise of Russia. VOCABULARY: Boyar- great landholding nobles. Czar- the Russian word for Ceasar. The Czar, in nature, was considered to be nature like all men, but in authority he is like the highest God.
  
Arab Empire: Rise and Spread of Islam
The learner will be able to 1. explain how Islam developed and spread.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Arab Empire Knowledge, Analysis Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 254 - 260 [Textbook].  1. Issues for Today Activity in the Global Issues book. 2. Organize a debate on the following statement: "By and large, Arab women benefited from the rise of Islam." VOCABULARY: Ethnic Group- is a large group of people who share the same language and cultural heritage.
  
Islam: Golden Age
The learner will be able to 1. discuss why the Arabs were able to develop an advanced society.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Arab Empire Knowledge Master 1.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 266 - 272 [Textbook].  1. Have students work in groups to research and report on a particular aspect of Muslim civilization during its golden age. Assign each group a different topic. Possible topics might include: Social Classes, Economy, Art, Literature, and Science. Encourage students to use library resources as well as information on the internet. For their reports to the class, advise students to use illustrations, maps, charts, videos, or other visual aids. VOCABULARY: Hijra- journey. Caliph- successor to Muhammad. Mosque- house of worship. Hajj- pilgramage to Mecca. Minaret- slender towers of mosques. Sultan- authority.
  
Arab Empire: Abbasid/Compare/Contrast
The learner will be able to 1. compare and contrast strengths and weaknesses of the Abbasid government with the Byzantine and Sassanid Empires.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Arab Empire Analysis, Synthesis Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 272 - 276 [Textbook].  
  
Ottoman Empire & Savafid Empires
The learner will be able to 1. analyze and compare the development of the Ottoman & Safavid Empires.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Arab Empire Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Synthesis Master 1.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 276 - 279 [Textbook].  1. Have students design a banner or write a motto that might have been used by one of the four social classes in the Ottoman empire. VOCABULARY: Millet- religious communities.
  
Africa: Kingdoms of East & West Afri
The learner will be able to 1. describe and compare the kingdoms that developed in east and west Africa.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
African Societies Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Evaluation Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 282 -289 [Textbook].  1. Have students imagine that they are a merchant preparing to embark on a camel carvan across the Sahara. Have them write a diary entry describing their feelings about the journey.
  
African Societies: Agriculture/Determine
The learner will be able to 1. describe how the natural environments of West Africa determined agricultural production.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
African Societies Comprehension Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 282 - 289 [Textbook].  1. Critical Thinking: Have students discuss the following: What effects did desertification have on African peoples? How might life in the United States be affected if well-watered areas began to turn into desert today?
  
Mongol Empire: Conquests of 1206 to 1279
The learner will be able to 1. recall the Mongol conquests of 1206 to 1279.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mongol Empire Knowledge Master 1.5 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 314 - 320 [Textbook].  1. Organize a class debate between Confucian scholars who want to end overseas voyages and court supporters of Zheng He.
  
China: Ming Dynasty
The learner will be able to 1. discuss how the Ming Dynasty affected the development of China.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Mongol Empire Application, Synthesis Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages: 314 - 320 [Textbook].  1. Critical Thinking: Have students discuss the following question: What does Marco Polo's awe at the differences between China and Europe at that time.
  
Korea: Cultural Influences
The learner will be able to 1. evaluate the influence of new thoughts in Chinese art, architecture, literary styles, and/or Confucianism on Korean culture.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Korean Civilization Knowledge, Comprehension, Evaluation Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages: 320 - 323 [Textbook].  1. Have students complete the map study on page 321 (World History) and explain how might the physical features of Korea have made it difficult to unite people. VOCABULARY: Hangul- an alphabet using symbols to represent the sounds of spoken Korean.
  
Japan: Wars with Mongols/Analyze
The learner will be able to 1. analyze how wars with the Mongols affected Japanese civilizations.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Asian Civilizations: Japan Analysis Master 0.7 Foundation Core Curriculum, September 1998, World History I Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 327 - 331 [Textbook].  1. Have students create a list of three dislikes written in the style of Sei Shonagon's Pillow Book. VOCABULARY: Archipelago- chain of islands. Kami- clan of Gods and Goddesses who were generated by spirits. Kana- phonetic symbols representing syllables. Shogun- supreme military commander. Daimyo- great warrior lords. Samurai- lesser lords. Bushido- the way of the warrior, the code emphasized honor, bravery, and absolute loyalty to one's lord.
  
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First Global Era (1450 - 1750)

Renaissance
The learner will be able to 1. explain why the Renaissance developed and how it affected Western Europe.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Synthesis Master 2.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 342 - 349 [Textbook].  Write on board "Does the ends ever justify the means?' Have the students respond to this question and formulate questions from their responses. Discuss with the class the material about Machiavelli and his work The Prince. Then have students read short excerpts from his work and write a reaction for the ruler in the spirit of Machiavelli. Discuss with the class Machiavelli's famous advice to rulers that they must be like both the fox and the lion: a fox to know about traps and how to avoid them and a lion to terrify the wolves. Do students think Machiavelli's advice is outdated? Have students create a cover for a magazine about the Italian Renaissance. Then write a short "Letter from the Publisher" in which they summarize the most important features of the Italian Renaissance. VOCABULARY: Patron- financial supporter of the arts. Humanism- intellectual movement based on the study of classical culture which focused on worldly subjects rather than on the religious issues that had occupied medieval thinkers. Perspective- artistic technique used to give drawings and paintings a tree-dimensional effect.
  
Rise of National States
The learner will be able to 1. do case studies of Louis XIV, Henry VIII, Catherine the Great, and Peter the Great.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Application, Synthesis, Evaluation Master 1.5 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 349 - 353 [Textbook].  Students will participate in the following activity: Imagine that Peter the Great wanted to learn about the latest technology and ways of life in the United States today. Draw up a list of the people he should meet and the places he should visit. Students should compare the goals and policies of Peter the Great to those of the following: Louis XIV, Fredrick II, and Maria Theresa. Show students the transparency (found in color transparency folder page C49) of A Craze for Porcelain Figures and High Fashion in France. This transparency will help illustrate the excesses of life under European monarchs in the late 1700's. Have student's reflect on what they have learned by asking them to respond to this question: If you could have been present for one event in the life of Peter the Great or Catherine the Great, what would it be and why? VOCABULARY: Absolute Monarchy- a ruler with complete authority over the government. Divine Right- belief that ones authority to rule came directly from God.
  
Reformation
The learner will be able to 1. explain why Martin Luther and other reformers succeeded in breaking away from the Catholic Church.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Knowledge Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 353 - 358 [Textbook].  On the chalkboard, create a chart to compare the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church with those of the new Protestant Churches. Set up three columns labeled Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and Calvinist. Set up the rows with such labels as Sources of Doctrine, Beliefs About Salvation, Church Hierarchy, and Religious Practices. Assign students to work together in groups to complete the chart. After they have finished, use the students' charts as the basis for a class discussion. Divide the class into groups and assign each group to prepare a newspaper that reports on events of 1517. Tell students that the focus of the newspaper should be Luther's attack on the Church. Newspapers should include news stories, interviews, and profiles of the personalities involved. There might also be editorials, letters to the editor, and cartoons about the controversy. Encourage students to divide the work so that some do research, others write, and others provide artwork. Read aloud to students the following statement from page 353 in the World History book, "In the 1500's...... the movement for reform unleashed forces that shattered Christian unity in Europe." Have students look for and note on a piece of paper the specific disagreements between Christians that led to the Protestant Reformation. VOCABULARY: Indulgence- a pardon for sins committed during a person's lifetime. Recant- to give up one's views. Predestination- the idea that God had long ago determined who would gain salvation. Theocracy- government run by church leaders.
  
Counter Refomation
The learner will be able to 1. explain how the Cathoilc Church responded to the growth of Protestantism.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Knowledge, Comprehension Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 358 - 364 [Textbook].  Ask students to find a news article about religious conflict in the world today. Have students share their stories and point out that conflicting ideas and practices played an important part in the Reformation. Have students work in groups to dramatize one of the events or developments described in the section titled Reformation Ideas Spread in the World History book. Each group might choose one of the following topics; Henry VII's Break With the Catholic Church, The Council of Trent, The Inquisition, The Life of Ignatius Loyola or they might choose a topic of their own. Advise students that they will need to do research, prepare scripts, assign roles, and rehearse their dramas. Remind them to be prepared to answer questions about their presentations. Ask students to draw a political cartoon that illustrates one aspect of the religious conflict that marked the Reformation. Create a cause and effect chart with the students, which describe the long-term causes and effects and immediate causes and effects of the Protestant Reformation. VOCABULARY: Annul- to cancel. Ghetto- In 1516, Jews in Venice had to live in a seperate quarter of the city known as the ghetto.
  
Reformation: Results
The learner will be able to 1. explain how the Reformation affected Western Europe and the world.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Analysis, Synthesis Master 1.0 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Pages 348 - 364 [Textbook].  DBQ on Reformation : Results
  
Commercial Revolution
The learner will be able to 1. explain why Europeans became interested in exploration and conquest 2. analyze how European exploration and conquest affected the world.
Strand Bloom's Scope Hours Source Activities
Emergence of Modern Europe Comprehension Master 0.7 Bay Shore School District(a) Lesson Plans
  Instructional Resources
 
· World History: Connections to Today, Prentice Hall, copyright 1999, Page 202 - 203 [Textbook].  Ask students to imagine that they are hosts of a science awards show. Have them select three figures of the Scientific Revolution who they think should receive a special award. For each of their honorees, ask them to write a speech summarizing his or her major achievements. Invite volunteers to deliver their speeches. Have students do the Viewpoint Activity found in Unit 4 binder page 14, titled Does the Earth Move? This reading provides two views on the theory of a sun-centered universe. Have students reenact Galileo's trial before the inquisition. VOCABULARY: Capita= Divide class into groups. Tell each group that they will become experts on one of the economic changes that occurred in Europe between 1000 and 1300. Assign each group one of the following topics: Agricultural Revolution, Revival of Trade, Commercial Revolution, or Life in a Medieval City. Have each group research their assigned topic and present their findings to the class in a panel discussion. Continue rotating panels until each topic has been covered. VOCABULARY: Capital- money for investing. Heliocentric- sun-centered model of the universe. Gravity- force that keeps the planets in their orbits around the sun.
  
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